The Electoral Commission is working through a number of complaints and queries on election day, including a graph made by Facebook.

An Electoral Commission spokeswoman said it received a few complaints early this morning, although they couldn't cite specific incidents as they were still being worked through.

The spokeswoman said the commission tended to get "quite a lot" of queries about the rules and what is allowed on election day.

The bar graph was headed
The bar graph was headed "Party leaders discussed in election conversations", and displayed the percentage of mentions candidates were generating.

"Many of the complaints will be about things that are legal."

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A handful of the complaints were about election signs still being up. In these cases, the relevant parties would be contacted and requested they take them down, she said.

A Facebook NZ post raised eyebrows in its comment section, with some users believing it to be a breach of Electoral Commission rules.

The image, posted about 10.30am and now deleted, depicted real-time mentions of political leaders on Facebook.

The bar graph was headed "Party leaders discussed in election conversations", and displayed the percentage of mentions candidates were generating.

"Bill English is generating the most mentions with Winston Peters generating the second highest number of mentions," the Facebook NZ post read.

One commenter felt the post was "clearly a breach of the rules", as it displayed popularity of leaders on election day.

"I have reported you to the Electoral Commission and encourage others to do the same," he said.

The Electoral Commission's spokeswoman said it had received complaints about the post and were looking into it.

Facebook has been approached for comment.

Herald readers also queried where sponsored Facebook posts fitted into the picture.

The commission said if it received complaints about sponsored posts on people's newsfeeds it would look into them.

"It may be that the sponsored post is dated 22 September or earlier, in which case it would be allowed."

Commuter Jane Burton questioned whether a 'David Seymour MP for Epsom' sign should still be up on Gillies Ave opposite Morrow St.

Seymour said he suspected it was his electorate office advertisement, which wasn't campaigning - "that's just me doing my job as the local MP making my office accessible to people".

"If someone can tell me I've got the Electoral Act all wrong then we'll cover it up, but I'm pretty sure a sign that's been there for three years pointing to my electorate offices is a legit sign."

The Electoral Commission spokeswoman said the sign was allowed under the Electoral Act section 197 (1)(g). The Act indicates names and emblems exhibited before polling day in a fixed position "and in relation to the New Zealand or regional or campaign headquarters" will not be an offence.