More children have reported being stopped by strangers in cars on Auckland's North Shore.

Hauraki School principal Clarinda Franklin said in today's newsletter she was "saddened" to report there had been three alleged suspicious approaches to children walking by themselves within a few days.

The most recent was that morning, when a 10-year-old student was walking on Ewen St, near the school in the North Shore suburb of Belmont.

"A vehicle pulled up alongside and the occupant then chased the girl who ran off," she said.

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"This has been reported to police and is now in the hands of the CIB who are investigating.

"I spoke to all children at assembly this week and gave some strong messages reminding them that they must never ever accept a ride or bribe from a stranger, nor should they engage in any conversation but just keep walking and run."

Franklin urged parents to remind their children about the danger. Police had also "strongly" recommended that children walk in pairs or groups. They should use the safest route and get home as fast as possible, she said.

Police confirmed they were investigating an August 3 report of a suspicious approach to a young person after school.

They received a separate report today, outlining a suspicious approaches today and another on August 3. The reports were being assessed, police said.

The Herald understands a boy from the school claimed he was approached on Walter St on August 3, when a man stopped his car, wound down the window and offered him a ride. When the boy declined he reportedly got out and chased him.

Franklin told the Herald she was unable to comment further as the alleged incidents were being investigated by police.

Police recommended that students be "alert but not alarmed", the newsletter said.

Media reports about suspicious approaches this year were followed by a rise in reports, possibly because children were on high alert.

In April and March four suspicious approaches towards children were reported on the North Shore. But there had been no rise in actual abductions, police said.