Today's speech by Winston Peters at his party's election-year conference was close to his 50th of the year.

Dargaville, Waipu, Cheviot, Whakatane, Paihia, Pukekohe, Motueka, Hokitika, Timaru, Oamaru, Gore, Thames ... and now in Manukau.

Peters loves a one-liner but when he told media at the conference his plan leading in to September 23 was to "bury our opponents with activity" he meant it.

His campaign bus was parked right outside the doors of the Vodafone Events Centre and it and Peters are the two stars of the party's new campaign video, officially released this weekend.

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While Aussie rocker John Farnham sings "let's not sit in silence, let's not sit in fear" we see the bus winding along the back roads.

Winston Peters loves a one-liner but when he told media in Manukau today his plan leading in to September 23 was to
Winston Peters loves a one-liner but when he told media in Manukau today his plan leading in to September 23 was to "bury our opponents with activity" he meant it. Photo / Dean Purcell

Peters watches a rugby game and drinks some Lion Red, warns the public of "fake news" and recalls how he and Bus have taken the road less travelled or even never travelled at all.

The video was well received by delegates, who have been in fine spirits this weekend.

Someone stole deputy leader Ron Mark's Stetson cowboy hat during a session on fundraising and attempted to auction it off. Peters laughed his way through media questions on his recent decision to quit smoking.

There's little angst about the party's trajectory, or debate about what else can be tried before the election. Everybody knows the plan and on whose shoulders it rests.

There was an odd acknowledgement of that during general business, when MP Pita Paraone took the mic to praise Peters' work ethic, and revealed he knows when his leader is tired because he gets "a bit scratchy".

"He is tired," party president Brent Catchpole agreed. "Getting around the country backwards and forwards, he is travelling all of the time."

Peters found some energy for his speech, delivered in front of a crowd of about 500.

He pledged to hold a referendum on abolishing the Maori seats and reducing the size of Parliament, and railed against "shiny bum" bureaucrats from Wellington and "latte-sippers" in Auckland who were contributing to the regions' neglect.

"We have a government that works for the few, but not for you," Peters said. "Political correctness is threatening New Zealand in terms of our free speech ... we will have every plane in the air to win. In the air to save this country's future."

If you live near a "road less travelled" those lines and Winston's bus could be coming your way soon.

New Zealand First leader Winston Peters aboard his campaign bus with MPs Darroch Ball, left, Fletcher Tabuteau, rear left, and Clayton Mitchell. Photo / Claire Trevett
New Zealand First leader Winston Peters aboard his campaign bus with MPs Darroch Ball, left, Fletcher Tabuteau, rear left, and Clayton Mitchell. Photo / Claire Trevett