Auckland's roads are so congested commuters are spending an extra 45 minutes a day - or four working weeks a year - stuck in traffic.

A new report has revealed the country's congestion is now worse than Hong Kong with the time spent on Auckland's roads doubling in the space of three years.

TomTom has released the results of its Traffic Index 2017, an annual report about traffic congestion in cities around the world.

Auckland is ranked as the 47th most congested city on the planet, worse than Hong Kong, which has a population of 7.2 million.

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Auckland's level of congestion has risen from 33 per cent of extra travel time in 2015 to 38 per cent in 2016.

Drivers in New Zealand's biggest city now spend an extra 45 minutes each day stuck in rush hour traffic, the equivalent to 172 hours, or four working weeks in a year.

Just three years ago Aucklanders were spending an extra 12 working days in traffic annually.

New Zealand also now has a higher congestion level than Australia, with Kiwis spending 29.83 per cent more time travelling per day.

Auckland, Wellington, Hamilton, Dunedin and Christchurch all experienced rising congestion, according the study.

Since 2008, New Zealand's national traffic congestion had risen to include an extra 43 per cent of travel time, worse off than Australia, which saw its congestion rise between 27.5 per cent and 35 per cent.

Traffic in Wellington is also worsening.

Congestion in the capital has increased from 30 per cent of extra time travelled to 34 per cent, adding an additional 43 minutes to drive time.

During the morning peak hours, drivers in Wellington can spend a whopping 72 per cent extra time stuck in traffic, the worst morning congestion in the country.

Early morning rush hour traffic in Wellington. Photo / File
Early morning rush hour traffic in Wellington. Photo / File

Hamilton has also seen a significant 5 per cent increase in traffic congestion to 26 per cent.

Drivers in Waikato's biggest city now spend an extra 103 hours per year stuck in traffic, or more than 12 working days per year.

Dunedin has seen the largest traffic congestion increase in the country at an additional 6 per cent of travel time added during the past 12 months.

The congestion level now adds an additional 28 per cent of extra time to commutes, with the worst time to travel in Dunedin between 3-4pm on a Friday when congestion extends the trip duration by 38 per cent.

Christchurch had the smallest increase in traffic congestion of 3 per cent, where drivers now face an extra 29 minutes of travel time per day.

Tauranga was also included in the survey for the first time and was found to be the least congested of the six New Zealand cities analysed.

However in morning rush hour, drivers can still expect to add 39 per cent extra travel time to their trip.

Global congestion

TomTom's historical data shows that traffic congestion is up by 23 per cent globally since 2008 with Oceania recording the highest increase in the world by 36 per cent.

Between 2015 and 2016, Europe's traffic congestion has increased by 9 per cent, North America is up by 5 per cent, Asia and Oceania are both up by 12 per cent, while South America is up 7 per cent and Africa by 15 per cent.

Southern European countries such as Italy (-7 per cent) and Spain (-13 per cent) have seen a large drop in traffic congestion during the past eight years.

The traffic index, now in its sixth year, looks at the traffic congestion situation in 393 cities in 48 countries on six continents.

Ranking of the most congested cities globally in 2016
(Overall daily congestion level - extra travel time - population over 800,000)

1. Mexico City, Mexico (66 per cent of extra travel time due to congestion).
2. Bangkok, Thailand (61 per cent).
3. Jakarta, Indonesia (58 per cent).
4. Chongqing, China (52 per cent).
5. Bucharest, Romania (50 per cent).
6. Istanbul, Turkey (49 per cent).
7. Chengdu, China (47 per cent).
8. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (47 per cent).
9. Tainan, Taiwan (46 per cent).
10. Beijing, China (46 per cent).

Read the full report here.