More than 1,000 men, women and children gathered outside the US Consulate General in downtown Auckland to join a march to champion women's rights in the wake of Trump's inauguration.

The march preceded the Women's March on Washington, which aims to send a bold message to the new US Government on its first day in office - and the world - that women's rights matter.

The march coincides with the Women's March in Washington. Photo / Alex Braae
The march coincides with the Women's March in Washington. Photo / Alex Braae

Some women had Hillary Clinton's signature "I'm with her" badges pinned to their tops. Others hold signs with the same message.

"My body, my choice" is written across the sign of another young woman.

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The march started making its way up Queen St at about 10.30am soundtracked by loud drumming. People spilled onto the road before the march moved from the footpath entirely, stopping traffic on the road.

Several marchers were shouting "dump Trump" as others cheered and waved signs.

The oldest marcher in Auckland today was Gwenyth, in her nineties.

Josie Olsem, 21, joins the march. Photo / Ophelia Buckleton
Josie Olsem, 21, joins the march. Photo / Ophelia Buckleton

California-born march organiser Cindy Buell led the march in a fluorescent jacket, grinning from ear to ear.

"We hope to be able to get our point across that human rights are women's rights," she said.

Many had rainbow flags tied around their shoulders and T-shirts emblazoned with "I'm with her".

Brightly coloured balloons floated above the heads of the marchers. Many were clapping, blowing whistles and dancing as they waved signs in the air. Staff came out of the stores along the road to watch the march, some joining in.

Lizzie Marvelly and Jacinda Ardern take part in the Women against Trump demonstration Queen Street. Photo / Doug Sherring
Lizzie Marvelly and Jacinda Ardern take part in the Women against Trump demonstration Queen Street. Photo / Doug Sherring

Jacinda Ardern was among those marching. She later addressed the crowd at Myers Park where more than 1,000 people lined the hills holding banners and signs proudly above their heads.

Ardern told the crowd the march matters because it shows women fighting together to trigger change.

"We know the power of the collective. You shut down Queen St without one police officer in sight."

She talked mainly about the gender pay gap and violence against women.

"Nothing shows you you've gone global quite like the fine men and women of Auckland taking to the streets."

Women against Trump demonstration Queen Street Auckland today. Photo / Doug Sherring
Women against Trump demonstration Queen Street Auckland today. Photo / Doug Sherring

Broadcaster Alison Mau was the MC of the event.

"Today is not a one off action. Today gives us an opportunity just to begin," she told the crowd.

"If is what comes after the march that matters."

No police were seen throughout the march.

"Police have not got involved because they say women are safe," Mau said.

Mau said she was impressed with the number of men who had turned out for the march.

People also marched in Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin today.

New Zealand was the first country in the world to start the worldwide Women's March, which will continue around the globe for 30 hours in different countries.

More than 200,000 are expected at the Women's March on Washington tomorrow.