Pilots deliver supplies to cut-off community in Kaikoura earthquake zone

Pilots of the NZ Farming and Andrea's Army who delivered supplies to tiny Rakautara, 22km north of Kaikoura, today for the first time since last Monday's earthquake. Photo / Supplied
Pilots of the NZ Farming and Andrea's Army who delivered supplies to tiny Rakautara, 22km north of Kaikoura, today for the first time since last Monday's earthquake. Photo / Supplied

More than a week since the 7.8 magnitude earthquake disconnected large sections of the South Island's east coast, supplies are only just landing.

The tiny settlement of Rakautara, 22km north of Kaikoura, was completely cut off by slips and damaged roads.

The settlement is so small, it does not appear on Google maps and residents had their first deliveries of help just today.

The family of Bill Campbell, who lives in the area, used the Kaikoura check-in and surrounding areas Facebook page to vent their frustrations at the seemingly forgotten area.

His daughter Rochelle McCormack said that there had been no continued support for those left in the area, with plans for boats to make deliveries flouted by choppy seas.

No emergency supplies were delivered, and they were facing an $1800 bill for basic supplies to be dropped by air.

"But my Dad & 5 others with homes, properties, animals to take care of in Rakautara, are on their own cos its too inconvenient [sic]!! And they are not alone in this isolation. Marlborough needs to get it together & follow Canterbury's lead!!!"

Just minutes after publishing the post, a plane was loaded with supplies from Culverden.

The delivery was courtesy of NZ Farming and Andrea's Army, a group of volunteers co-ordinating rescue efforts for earthquake-struck residents in Canterbury and Marlborough.

"It's a bit emotional," she said after the delivery. "They were saying it was too unsafe to land helicopters, but they managed to land a Cessna on the road."

There were about six people and some animal left in the settlement, and she was happy they finally had some support, she said.

The tiny settlement of Rakautara may not appear on Google maps, but it is nevertheless world famous for its landmark Nin's Bin crayfish shack. Photo / Chee Hong, Flickr
The tiny settlement of Rakautara may not appear on Google maps, but it is nevertheless world famous for its landmark Nin's Bin crayfish shack. Photo / Chee Hong, Flickr

- NZ Herald

Get the news delivered straight to your inbox

Receive the day’s news, sport and entertainment in our daily email newsletter

SIGN UP NOW

© Copyright 2017, NZME. Publishing Limited

Assembled by: (static) on production bpcf05 at 24 Jan 2017 15:30:49 Processing Time: 547ms