Did you wake up this morning feeling blue following yesterday's shock election result, ready to crawl back into bed for the next four years?

You could be suffering from a serious case of "Trumpression".

Trumpression: A depressed mood or a loss of interest in daily activities, as a result of Donald Trump's unimaginable success in last night's presidential election.

Californian Dr Danny Osborne, a psychology lecturer at Auckland University, was applying for New Zealand citizenship as he spoke to the Herald.

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He assured us that the Trump blues were very much real, but only a temporary state of mind.

"We are seeing a temporary fluctuation of people's moods.

"People will be disappointed for a few weeks but they will be acting as they normally do within six months.

"Polls were showing Clinton was going to win. We have been confronted with something we didn't expect and is aversive."

Osborne said there was considerable anger out there, "as well as a lot of disbelief and shock".

"It was a chance for America to take a progressive step by electing the first female president."

Californian Dr Danny Osborne is applying for New Zealand citizenship following the US election results. Photo / Supplied
Californian Dr Danny Osborne is applying for New Zealand citizenship following the US election results. Photo / Supplied

Political scientist Dr Maria Armoudian said the result was a huge step back for "women, gays, people of colour, the environment, the judiciary".

However Armoudian disapproved of the term "Trumpression" - preferring to describe her current state of mind as "deeply disturbed".

"I know a lot of people are depressed though, and a huge number are incredibly saddened. There are a lot of reasons to feel that grief."

Psychotherapist Kyle MacDonald said the Trump effect has caused a lot of hysteria. Photo / Supplied
Psychotherapist Kyle MacDonald said the Trump effect has caused a lot of hysteria. Photo / Supplied

Kyle MacDonald, a psychotherapist and Herald mental health columnist, said if people were prone to depression or anxiety, the Trump effect would certainly "feed into this".

"There is an increase in general anxiety and fear.

"I cannot imagine what it must be like to belong to a minority in the US today. Those people will understandably be anxious and worried."

MacDonald feared an increase would emerge of "Trump-type behaviour" in America, such as bullying and racism.

Four tips to beat the Donald Trump blues:

• Focus on actions that can better our communities.
• Take a step back from the news and think about "how much is healthy for me?"
• Distract yourself with something positive such as donating to a cause, to reaffirm your values.
• Armoudian said be more proactive by forming groups and educating yourself about the issues and policies in America.