Cherie Howie

Cherie Howie is a reporter for the Herald on Sunday.

Sentence too short: victims

Former junior Tall Black likely to be home for Christmas.

Robert Dahlberg in Singapore. Photo / Straits Times
Robert Dahlberg in Singapore. Photo / Straits Times

A Kiwi broker jailed in Singapore for attacking two men could be home by Christmas, his father says.

But the victims of former junior Tall Black Robert Dahlberg say they are still waiting for an apology and that the five-month jail sentence given to the 35-year-old for the attack was not long enough.

Dahlberg has been in jail since September when he was arrested after returning to Singapore. He had spent more than a year on the run when he skipped bail and left the country.

Last week Dahlberg was sentenced to five months' jail. He had admitted voluntarily causing hurt to Paul Liew, who suffered a gash to his head and a broken nose after Dahlberg slammed him against a pillar and kicked him in the face during a brawl that also involved two of Dahlberg's friends. The trio had just left a black-tie charity event called White Collar Boxing.

Another charge of causing hurt by a rash act, which occurred when Dahlberg punched Liew's friend Laurence Wong in the head, was taken into consideration by the sentencing judge.

Dahlberg's Nelson-based father Bill told the Herald on Sunday the family was relieved the sentencing was over. "He'll be home for Christmas ... because there's time off for good behaviour."

His son had no plans to appeal against the sentence, but the family has to wait another 10 days to hear whether the deputy prosecutor's office will appeal.

Dahlberg, who travelled to Singapore to support his son during the sentencing, would not comment on whether he thought the sentence was fair, or how his son had reacted.

Liew said no sentence was ever enough to make up for the trauma victims suffered.

He had been diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder and avoided crowded places, but could not afford to pay for counselling.

"I can see the line on my forehead [from the attack] every morning in the mirror. It's an unfortunate reminder."

Dahlberg had twice offered him $20,000 compensation, but Liew turned the offers down because they were made while Dahlberg was on the run.

Dahlberg was not remorseful. "Paul and I have not received any apology from him at all." He felt sorry for Dahlberg's parents, as their son's actions had shamed the family name. "After knowing that his mother wailed in court, I can tell how heartbroken and disappointed she is."

- Herald on Sunday

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