The BBC has announced plans to produce a feature length documentary about the Harvey Weinstein scandal.

The disgraced producer has been accused of sexual misconduct by dozens of actresses, following an expose by The New York Times and The New Yorker, and now the British broadcaster is set on making "the definitive documentary" for BBC Two, with two-time Oscar-winning filmmaker Ursula Macfarlane at the helm.

Interviews with "the many actresses who have been brave enough to tell their stories" are promised for the film, along with comments from reporters and Hollywood insiders.

It's said the documentary - with the working title 'Weinstein' - will explore how he abused his power and covered his tracks, while it also vows to "illuminate Hollywood's deep-rooted sexism".


BBC commissioner Tom McDonald said "[The film will] ask difficult and challenging questions about complicity, the price of silence and the corrosive effects of power. This film promises to be the definitive take on the Weinstein scandal ... As well as revealing the inside story of the past few months in minute detail, it will also look to the past to tell the story of abuses of power within Hollywood since its very origins and chart the rise of Harvey Weinstein himself over many decades."

Meanwhile, BBC Two controller Patrick Holland has described director Ursula as "perfectly placed" to take the lead on the project.

He said: "The breaking of silence over Harvey Weinstein is a watershed moment for the creative industries and for wider society.

"Ursula is a brilliant film-maker and is perfectly placed to make the definitive documentary, piecing together the story of just how he abused his power and position."

Weinstein has denied all allegations of non-consensual sex since the allegations were made against him.