Prince William entered the Great British Bake Off debate today - commiserating with a group of youngsters unhappy that it is moving to Channel 4.

At a cake-decorating session he compared his efforts to those of the show's amateur bakers saying - 'Mary Berry, eat your heart out!'.

He also told volunteer Patricia Nunoo, 17: "I've watched Bake Off a few times - you must be distraught it's moving."

Prince William ices a cake during the visit. Photo / AP
Prince William ices a cake during the visit. Photo / AP

While comforting other fans he said he thought the show will be 'just as good' after its move to the traditionally youth-orientated channel.

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William also tried out his dance moves on a visit to a London youth centre - but drew the line at stepping into the boxing ring with a 12-year-old.

"I've left my gloves at home," he told Dante Morgan after being challenged to a fight at Caius House in Battersea, south London.

The duke was less shy about joining a teenage dance troupe, the Scariofunk Dance Collective.

Prince William meets young people in a boxing ring. Photo / AP
Prince William meets young people in a boxing ring. Photo / AP

"I can never get the shoulder shiver right,' he said as he asked for a quick tutorial on one of their moves. 'There is no pressure, because I will look ridiculous."

He was probably right: his mentor, Candice Blake, 15, gave him a "generous" 5 out of 10 for his performance.

"But 10 out of 10 for effort. He was up for it."

He may be heir to the throne but what Prince William makes up for in blue blood, he lacks in rhythm.

The 34-year-old proved he's no snakehips as he joined the Scariofunk dance collective during a visit to Caius House Youth Centre in London.

The Prince giggled with the teachers as he was watched by youths at Caius House, which aspires to bring the local community together by helping young people bridge the educational and life skills gap between childhood and adulthood.

It's clear where Prince William gets his dance moves from; William's enthusiastic dancing was reminiscent of his father Prince Charles's regular attempts to blend in with local traditions via some questionable moves.

Most famously, during his first visit to Brazil in 1978, Charles took to the dance floor with a Samba dancer during a party staged by the mayor of Rio De Janeiro.