Kirsty Wynn

Kirsty Wynn is a senior reporter at the Herald on Sunday.

Men cuddle up on cold nights

A study has found men are more likely to endure a chilly night without a hot water bottle or an extra blanket.
A study has found men are more likely to endure a chilly night without a hot water bottle or an extra blanket.

We've all heard about men struggling with man-flu — but it seems guys will do it tough between the sheets.

A new study has found men are more likely to endure a chilly night in bed than grab an extra blanket or cosy up to a hot water bottle - as most women do.

The nationwide HRV State of Home Survey found a clear gender divide on home heating and awareness of what makes a healthy home.

More than half of the 505 people in the Buzz Channel research said they suffered in some way due to the state of their home.

For men, it was common to "tough it out" between cold sheets instead of warming the bed with a hot water bottle or electric blanket.

Those who were pro-active used beanies (8 per cent), socks (37 per cent), flannel pyjamas and extra blankets (61 per cent).

Some said they "cuddled up" to their partner to get warm.

Women were more aware of what it takes to create a warm, dry home and were more likely to take temporary measures to treat condensation by opening windows and wiping away moisture.

The survey revealed damp and mould were widespread. Other findings included:

• Mould in 59 per cent of homes.

• Condensation in 31 per cent of homes.

• 59 per cent of tenants moved out of a house because of damp and mould.

• 27 per cent had curtains, clothes and carpets damaged by mould.

• People who took sick days were more likely to have damp and mould in their house.

• Women were more likely to stay home with sick children.

People were also asked if they wanted their home to undergo a Warrant of Fitness as recently trialled by the Government.

Sixty-three per cent wanted their house tested so they could make improvements.

She likes it hot, he stays barely cooler

Radio host Mel Homer doesn't do cold.

She opts for flannelette sheets made burning hot with an electric blanket and an over-sized T-shirt from her late dad, John Homer. If it is really chilly, she's in her favourite onesie.

Husband Andy Pilcher prefers his blanket on low and nothing between him and the sheets. "We have separate electric blankets because I have my side really hot and he has his much cooler," Homer, host of new Auckland radio station Mix 98.2, said.

The mum of three young boys also has a faux fur throw that heats up like an electric blanket.

"It is the best thing ever. It is hard to fit all the boys and me under it though," she said.

- Herald on Sunday

© Copyright 2014, APN New Zealand Limited

Assembled by: (static) on production bpcf04 at 29 Dec 2014 00:04:39 Processing Time: 480ms