Setback to finding HIV vaccine

The search for the the HIV vaccine has had another set back. Photo / Thinkstock
The search for the the HIV vaccine has had another set back. Photo / Thinkstock

The hunt for a HIV vaccine has gobbled up $US8 billion ($NZ9.87 billion) in the past decade, and the failure of the most recent efficacy trial has delivered yet another setback to 26 years of efforts.

With the next attempts expected to be years away, top researchers now say there is a gap in current clinical trial efforts to test whether a vaccine may be safe and effective in people.

A kind of ongoing autopsy of the last four major bids to make a HIV vaccine has informed the field as to what does not work, with the latest casualty being a trial called HVTN 505, halted early because it did not prevent HIV.

"It leaves us with a gap in several years before we have another HIV vaccine efficacy trial under way, and that is unfortunate," said James Kublin, executive director of the HIV Vaccine Trials Network.

Another concern for researchers is that two vaccine trials – HVTN 505 and a previous trial known as STEP that ended unsuccessfully in 2007 – both revealed apparent increases in the number of vaccinated patients who got HIV.

HVTN 505 showed 41 cases of HIV were acquired in the vaccine group, compared to 31 in the placebo group. Among some 2500 participants, the difference was not statistically significant, and so researchers found no harm was caused by the trial.

"But the number is in the wrong direction," said trial leader Scott Hammer, who described the trial's outcome as a "disappointment".

Researchers are still investigating why this may have happened, but some theorise the cold virus known as Ad5 that served as a vector to deliver the vaccine may have somehow caused more infections by making it easier for HIV to penetrate the body.

"You scratch your head," said Hammer, a professor of medicine at Columbia University, adding that Ad5 may now be considered too risky and other options are being investigated.

"No one is going to want to a do a major trial with this sort of vector in the future," he told AFP.

The key puzzle in the vaccine search has been the nature of the human immunodeficiency virus itself, which has managed to fool modern medicine by changing its genetic makeup so often that a single weapon cannot silence it.

A small number of HIV-positive people have been found to produce antibodies that can neutralise a broad range of HIV variants, but scientists have not yet figured out how to make a vaccine from that information.

About 34 million people are infected with HIV worldwide, and AIDS has killed 30 million people since the epidemic began 30 years ago.

- AFP

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