The Pirate Bay relocates to North Korea

Photo / Thinkstock
Photo / Thinkstock

Internet file-sharing website The Pirate Bay claims it has relocated to North Korea.

The site, which was ejected from Sweden last night, said it had been invited by the leader of North Korea, Kim Jong Un, to "fight our battles from their network".

"This is truly an ironic situation. We have been fighting for a free world, and our opponents are mostly huge corporations from the United States of America, a place where freedom and freedom of speech is said to be held high. At the same time, companies from that country is chasing a competitor from other countries, bribing police and lawmakers, threatening political parties and physically hunting people from our crew. And to our help comes a government famous in our part of the world for locking people up for their thoughts and forbidding access to information," The Pirate Bay said in a statement on its website.

"We believe that being offered our virtual asylum in Korea is a first step of this country's changing view of access to information.

It's a country opening up and one thing is sure, they do not care about threats like others do. In that way, TPB and Korea might have a special bond. We will do our best to influence the Korean leaders to also let their own population use our service, and to make sure that we can help improve the situation in any way we can. When someone is reaching out to make things better, it's also ones duty to grab their hand."

Tech news site Torrent Freak said it had traced The Pirate Bay's IP address back to the reclusive state, confirming the move.

Some users of the website were critical of the decision to associate with the North Korean dictatorship.

"North Korea doesn't exactly bring to mind images of freedom of information," patiodude wrote.

- nzherald.co.nz

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