Dannevirke: Lock stuff away, warn police

By Christine McKay

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Senior Sergeant Nathan Davis of Tararua police is warning people about their lax attitude to locking sheds and houses.
Senior Sergeant Nathan Davis of Tararua police is warning people about their lax attitude to locking sheds and houses.

With a rising burglary rate in the Tararua, police are urging residents to help themselves by locking things away.

"We had another burglary on Top Grass Rd this week and once again nothing was locked away," Senior Sergeant Nathan Davis of the Tararua police said. "Without witnesses or forensics how do we get resolution on this type of burglary? People need to lock their stuff away.

"Burglaries across the Tararua are going up and up and when I look at the crime sheets one thing sticks out, insecure sheds and property.

"Since July 1 last year, we've had an extra 49 burglaries, that's almost one more a week. Nobody wants to be burgled, but people need to make it harder for the offenders."

Chainsaws and farm equipment were stolen in the latest rural burglary on Top Grass Rd and Mr Davis said he believes a number of rural thefts are opportunist.

"Someone passing through runs out of petrol and goes to a farm shed. It's open and everything is there for the taking. Also offenders know dairy farmers are out around 2.30pm bringing cows into the shed and at 6am and 4pm, they'll be milking, so this gives offenders a window. But why make it easy? Lock your stuff up."

A frustrated Mr Davis said two recent complaints about thefts both related to sheds being insecure.

"I can't make people lock their sheds, but it's making our job very difficult. I don't think a padlock is an inconvenience."

With good gains in tackling domestic violence and crime out on our streets, Mr Davis said residents need to change their mindset.

"Stolen chainsaws are good currency and I also see firearms in sheds. Get a cabinet and lock them away. I appreciate farmers are very busy but there are thousands of dollars of trailers, calf feeders chainsaws and other things being stolen. By grinding in serial numbers and taking photographs we can make it harder for offenders because they have nothing to gain."

As well as insecure sheds, unlocked garages and cars left in driveways with keys in the ignition are an open invitation to offenders. "The days of being able to leave your house or shed unlocked are gone," Mr Davis said.

- Hawkes Bay Today

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