Four Hamiltonians are among the 2018 New Year honours recipients for their services to New Zealand society.

Professor Roger Moltzen, Evelyn Weir, Lynnette Flowers and Cynthia Ward were all recognised on the New Year honours list at the start of 2018.

Prof Moltzen will be made a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit for his services to education.

Prof Moltzen has played an important leadership and advisory role in shaping the direction of gifted and talented educational provisions in New Zealand.

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He took up a position at the University of Waikato Faculty of Education after 20 years as a teacher and principal. He has held a number of leadership roles at the University, including Director of Postgraduate Special Education Programmes, foundation chair of the Department of Human Development and Counselling, and Faculty Dean from 2011 to 2016.

Prof Moltzen said he was caught out by the award.

"One of complete surprise as I certainly had never expected such recognition. I also felt very humbled but extremely honoured," Prof Moltzen said.

"I have had held many different positions in my 50 years in education and some of the drivers have changed as these roles have changed. However, a constant throughout has been a deep belief in the power of education to transform lives and to contribute to a better and fairer society."

Mrs Weir will be made a Companion of the Queen's Service Order for her contributions to seniors and the community.

She has contributed to the communities of Christchurch and Hamilton through a range of organisations and community groups.

In 1997 she was instrumental in the establishment of the Celebrating Age Centre for the Hamilton City Council and served as manager until 1998.

"I was humbled that recognition had been given to me for my commitment and contributions with involvement in Age Concern Hamilton and further with Age Concern New Zealand as a Board member and then four years as national president along with other numerous community and not-for-profit organisations," Mrs Weir said.

"My main perspective and driver behind services for seniors has been to see that all older people receive the respect, support and services that they may need as well as a commitment to advocate and support the empowerment of older people in a positive inclusive society where they are respected.

Mrs Flowers and Mrs Ward have both been awarded the Queen's Service Medal for services to the community and to nursing and children's health.

Lynette Flowers who has been awarded the Queen's Service Medal for services to the community. Photo / Supplied
Lynette Flowers who has been awarded the Queen's Service Medal for services to the community. Photo / Supplied

Mrs Flowers is a businesswoman who has used her networking expertise to support the work of not-for-profit organisations in the Waikato region for 15 years.

Mrs Flowers was co-opted in 2003 to the Waikato Chamber of Commerce Board to reinvigorate the Business Women's Network. She grew that database from zero to nearly 400 members.

"My initial reaction was one of disbelief, followed by who would think to do this for me? I still don't know," Mrs Flowers said.

"There are so many more deserving people out there who also deserve recognition."

"Without the support of my husband I could never do what I do so this award is as much about him as me. The rewards are huge. Seeing people succeed or change their attitude or achieve something they never thought they could are all motivating factors for me."

Cynthia Ward who will be awarded the Queen's service medal for services to to nursing and children's health. Photo / Supplied
Cynthia Ward who will be awarded the Queen's service medal for services to to nursing and children's health. Photo / Supplied

Mrs Ward is a nurse who has specialised in the care of children since 2000, with a focus on palliative care.

In 2003 Mrs Ward helped establish Rainbow Place, a children's hospice service at Hospice Waikato. The first service of its kind in New Zealand, Rainbow Place provides nursing care and counselling to children with life-limiting, life-threatening illnesses, and counselling to children with adult family members receiving palliative care.

"My initial reaction was shock and disbelief. I thought they must have the wrong person," Mrs Ward said.

"I certainly do not think I deserve to be singled out from others who work in this field with children who have health needs and their families."

"David, my husband deserves the award for his belief in me, his understanding and he is the most patient man I know."

Mrs Ward's determination to keep serving the community comes from her childhood.

"As a child, I had an experience where my voice was not heard, this is the constant driver for me to ensure where possible every child's voice is heard and understood, particularly when they are unwell therefore, even more vulnerable."