The sequel to Earth, this feature-length nature documentary is everything you'd expect it to be. A moving, funny, emotional and educational look at the natural world and its wildlife inhabitants, captured through stunning, technically advanced cinematography.

The only surprise is David Attenborough doesn't narrate - my 11-year-old son's first comment was how young Sir David sounded. Environmentalist and film-maker Robert Redford steps up to the microphone here - accents aren't my son's strong suit - and anyway, James Earl-Jones narrated Earth.

The point is, there's nothing new to Earth's formula but it doesn't matter. Kids can't get enough of this wholesome, awe-inspiring footage; it's a family affair and there's not an animated character in sight.

To make sure the whole family is captured from the start, the three very well qualified directors behind Earth: One Amazing Day throw a panda bear at us in the first 5 minutes… which may require a quick conversation about why your family can't get a pet panda bear. And it just gets more cute from here.

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As the title suggests, this documentary follows life on earth for one day, marveling in the role the sun plays in providing our tilted planet with different terrains and their pretty cool animals. Travel from the highest mountains to the remotest islands, and from exotic jungles to the depths of the oceans. We discover how giraffes fight (you've got to see it to believe it), meet sperm whales hanging vertically to sleep, sloths that swim for love, Galapagos iguanas outrunning snakes, and bears comically scratching against trees … finishing with a loud fart.

My kids had already shown me a few of these clips online (which apparently have already appeared on Planet Earth II), but they're so good you don't mind the repetition.

The neat thing about being able to see Earth: One Amazing Day on the big screen is being able to appreciate the camera work bringing this story to life. Watch out though, when we move into night-time, the directors don't hold back on making the dark a scary and shadowy place - once again they're making sure their target audience is focused.

Earth: One Amazing Day doesn't address climate change or environmental issues in any great depth, rather it reminds us of the incredible world we live in, and that alone will probably create a few more environmentalists.

Directors:

Peter Webber, Lixin Fan, Richard Dale

Running Time:

95 mins

Rating:

G

Verdict:

A great way to travel the world with your kids without leaving town.