In this image there are three No Entry signs, an arrow on the road pointing the other way, road cones and barriers in place to prevent entry. But, writes a flabbergasted reader, "a driver came from the bottom of the image, and carefully drove around the barrier before heading the wrong way up the street, got to the other end, and then did a 10-point turn, only to come back out the way they came in. Two minutes later, a moped came along Federal St from the right of the picture, did a 180 around the end of the cones, to also head the way wrong down the same street."

Kindness abounds on city's K Rd ridge

"I love Auckland," declares Peter. "It was a beautiful day. I had been to the YMCA Fitness Centre in town to try to improve on perfection. I then adjourned to nearby K Rd where I bought a $2 coffee and sat on a nearby public bench. I am a fuller-figured, middle-aged male and I had my large gym bag on the seat beside me and several kindly folk offered me their coinage."

"Individually cellophane-wrapped paper napkins. What was Robert Harris thinking?" asks a reader.

Live animal label easily explained

Dave from Tauranga writes about Sally Hughes' comments on an airline live animal label. "The four pictures are merely symbols for whether the animal is a mammal, bird, fish or reptile, hence the contents space for writing in. If they had to do a picture for every genus in each one, the label would be bigger than the plane." She can however feel sad for amphibians, who are clearly discriminated against and have to pretend to be reptiles.

Sometimes anarchy only way to change the rules

"In 1958 I started at Rangiora High School. Enrolment completed, we were left to our own devices as it was school sports day," writes Laing Wood. "On that first day two of us were unfairly caned by 'Thug' - he deserved his nickname - for crossing an unmarked sports race track on the school farm while a running race was in progress. My father told me that I had the right to refuse a caning. Some months later I was sent to the headmaster to be caned for some minor infringement, and when I refused he didn't know what to do. Once the word got around, more and more boys followed suit, forcing the school to change its ways. They were a lot more circumspect about issuing detentions, as that meant providing supervision after-hours."

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Got a Sideswipe? Send your pictures, links and anecdotes to Ana at ana.samways@nzherald.co.nz