Ghost Chips or Bugger? New Zealand's best ad is down to two

Darcy-Ray Flavell-Hudson, the star of the 2011 anti drink driving advertising campaign known as 'Ghost Chips'. Photo/Alan Gibson
Darcy-Ray Flavell-Hudson, the star of the 2011 anti drink driving advertising campaign known as 'Ghost Chips'. Photo/Alan Gibson

A poll that asks TV fans determine the greatest ad to screen in New Zealand has come down to the wire.

The poll ran yesterday on nzherald.co.nz and featured 10 well known Kiwi advertising campaigns.

Read more: New Zealand's greatest TV commercials of all time

We couldn't decide which ad was best, so we asked readers to vote for their favourites.

And the results, so far, are dead even.

The two favourites, Toyota's 1999 Bugger campaign, and 2011's anti drink driving 'Ghost Chips' series, topped a list that also included Spot the dog, The Great Crunchie Train Robbery, Crumpy and Scotty, and Instant Kiwi's Trout Fishing.

As of 8am today, Bugger and Ghost Chips had received 26 per cent of the votes. The nearest runner-up was The Great Crunchie Train Robbery at 11 per cent.

The campaign isn't over, so check out the two finalists and keep voting below.

1999: Bugger

A series of farming mishaps each provoke the laconic comment - bugger. This was the formula behind one of our most iconic Kiwi advertisements. The Toyota Hilux "Bugger" ad attracted 120 complaints to the Advertising Standards Authority, who ruled that bugger was unlikely to cause serious offence. The shock value of that word, the role of Hercules the dog, and the performance of the hapless farmer - in the tradition of Dagg and Footrot - made for Kiwi pop culture magic.



2011: Ghost Chips

The newest commercial in our Top 10 is the 2011 anti-drink driving ad that became a Kiwi pop cultural phenomenon, spawning countless parodies, memes, t-shirts and over a million YouTube views; phrases from the ad entered the vernacular ("you know I can't grab your ghost chips" and "I've been internalising a really complicated situation in my head"). Eschewing the usual shock and horror tactics, the ad used humour to get the message across that it was choice to stop a mate from driving drunk.



Which is the best? Vote here:


- NZ Herald

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