Snoop Dogg to star in TV show documenting work with Steelers

Snoop Dogg is using his influence to help kids in a new TV show. Photo / Supplied
Snoop Dogg is using his influence to help kids in a new TV show. Photo / Supplied

With a criminal career that takes in cocaine-trafficking, rolling with Los Angeles gangs, weapons charges and a murder trial, he may be an unlikely role model.

But Snoop Dogg, infamous for violent, misogynous lyrics and a lifelong love of marijuana, is shaking off his bad boy image to reveal his softer side - as avuncular little league football trainer Coach Snoop.

The 44-year-old founded the Snoop Youth Football League more than a decade ago and has been quietly teaching thousands of inner city children teamwork, discipline and self-respect through sport.

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Now his little-known community work is to be made public in Coach Snoop, a reality show chronicling the rise of his Diamond Valley Steelers from a rag-tag bunch of 12-year-olds from the mean streets of LA to one of the top youth teams in the United States.

"The experiences I give these kids, it's nothing to me but it means the world to them and I'm just privileged to be able to take my Snoop Dogg power and use it to sprinkle all this love to these kids," said Snoop.

Most of the children know who he is, but the millionaire musician is at pains to keep his R-rated hip-hop persona away from the football field.

Snoop's had to play down his rap persona for the benefit of the kids. Photo / Richard Robinson
Snoop's had to play down his rap persona for the benefit of the kids. Photo / Richard Robinson

"I've never busted a rap for the kids. Thirteen years I've been coaching, I ain't never did one rap," Snoop said at a preview screening of Coach Snoop in Hollywood on Monday.

"If a kid calls me Snoop Dogg they gotta do 20 push-ups. They know they don't get Snoop Dogg until they hit 19 or 20."

The show was directed by multiple Emmy award-winning sports filmmaker Rory Karpf, who helmed the ESPN miniseries Snoop and Son, about the rapper's relationship with his son, UCLA wide receiver Cordell Broadus.

"It was actually shocking - I didn't realize how involved he was. He's involved to the point where he's sitting down with these kids talking about their grades and home life, and bullying," Karpf told reporters.

"What he says on the series is this is his true calling, and he looks at music as a means to an end."

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