David Bowie's last release, Lazarus, was 'parting gift' for fans in carefully planned finale

By Hannah Furness

The producer of Blackstar confirms David Bowie had planned his poignant final message, and videos and lyrics show how he approached his death.
The singer and those closest to him arranged the release at the end of his life, after 18 months of living with cancer. Photo: Veto/YouTube
The singer and those closest to him arranged the release at the end of his life, after 18 months of living with cancer. Photo: Veto/YouTube

David Bowie's final record was a carefully-orchestrated farewell to his fans, his producer has confirmed.

Lazarus, released on Bowie's 69th birthday just two days before his death, opens with the lyrics: "Look up here, I'm in Heaven!"

Tony Visconti, the producer who worked with Bowie to complete his final album, has released a statement saying it was deliberately created and timed as a "parting gift" for his fans.

In a statement on his Facebook page, he said: "He always did what he wanted to do. And he wanted to do it his way and he wanted to do it the best way.

He always did what he wanted to do. And he wanted to do it his way and he wanted to do it the best way. His death was...

Posted by Tony Visconti on Monday, January 11, 2016

"His death was no different from his life - a work of Art.

"He made Blackstar for us, his parting gift.

"I knew for a year this was the way it would be. I wasn't, however, prepared for it.

"He was an extraordinary man, full of love and life. He will always be with us.

"For now, it is appropriate to cry."

Visconti has previously spoken of creating the album, which was recorded in just three sessions over the course of three months at the beginning of 2015.

It now appears the singer and those closest to him arranged its release at the end of his life, after 18 months of living with cancer.

The music video finishes with him retreating in to a dark closet. Photo: Vevo/YouTube
The music video finishes with him retreating in to a dark closet. Photo: Vevo/YouTube

Music writer Graham Reid says the legacy of David Bowie can't be underestimated.

He says without him, we wouldn't have the likes of Lady Gaga, Madonna, or even Prince.

He says David Bowie proved that musicians could reinvent themselves, and experiment with different styles.

- Daily Telegraph UK

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