A male teacher who asked a female trainee if he could spank her bottom with a school paddle has been banned from teaching.

The teacher, whose name is suppressed, claimed he had "a sex addiction in which he fantasised about corporal punishment between adults". He described it as a "stress/anxiety reliever".

The Teachers Disciplinary Tribunal has censured him and cancelled his teaching registration.

A district court has also convicted him for forging two letters on a university's letterhead seeking participants for a study on corporal punishment.

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"The second letter detailed the corporal punishment study and stated each participant would have to give the other 'four hard swats on the bottom using a school paddle'," the tribunal said.

The man made the spanking request at an unnamed primary school in June 2016, two and a half years after he gained his teaching registration.

He had been supporting his colleague, named only as Ms A, with her training for about three months, the tribunal said.

He showed Ms A an initial letter on university letterhead on June 14 seeking participants for a study on corporal punishment. Ms A signed a confidentiality statement "believing she would be part of a university study".

"On June 17 the respondent presented a second forged document to Ms A. Again, he had used the university letterhead," the tribunal said.

"The second letter detailed the corporal punishment study and stated each participant would have to give the other 'four hard swats on the bottom using a school paddle'.

"Ms A became extremely uncomfortable and disclosed what she still believed to be a confidential study to the school principal. The principal made enquiries and established there was no such study and the researcher named in the letter was not a member of staff at the university.

During the subsequent school disciplinary process, the man explained he had a sex addiction and fantasised about corporal punishment between adults. Even thinking about spanking gave him comfort, he said.

"The respondent apologised to Ms A and acknowledged his actions were 'nothing short of dishonest and self-serving'."

He pleaded guilty in the district court to forgery and was ordered to pay Ms A an "emotional harm payment" of $2500. Names of the teacher, the trainee and the school were all suppressed.

The tribunal found that the teacher's behaviour was "the antithesis of the standard of honesty expected of teachers" and brought the teaching profession into disrepute.

It cancelled his registration, but because of the district court decision did not order him to pay further costs.