Police are investigating a video that appears to show a Rotorua gang member smoking P and rapping about his life in the Mongrel Mob.

The video was posted to Facebook on Saturday and had been viewed more than 27,000 times before it was taken down on Tuesday.

While smoking a substance from a glass pipe, the man in the video raps various verses about his life in the Mongrel Mob and "selling drugs" in Rotorua.

"Rotorua I've got love for my city another day another dollar selling drugs in my city," he raps. "Cause I'm smoking on P, collecting fees, rolling in the city, feeling the summertime breeze."

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The caption above the video read: "THIS IS ME DAILY 26/13 SMOKING DRUGS COMMITTING CRIME BUSTING FREESTYLES ROTOVEGAS DOGLIFE."

The video has already received hundreds of comments from those condemning his actions and pleading with him to get off the drug.

One person wrote: "Looks hideous seeing our own on that shet!!!! Hideous even more when you don't think nothing is wrong with that crap!!!!! Pray for you to see the light and get out of that dark cloud."

Police told they Herald they have reviewed the video with local staff and have begun making inquiries into the matter.

"There is nothing positive about the use of methamphetamine," a police spokesperson said. "Methamphetamine has a devastating impact on our communities, especially our youth and vulnerable. It affects not only the person using it, but their families, friends and communities."

Earlier in the year a Police Association report said meth is more readily available than cannabis in some New Zealand towns.

"New Zealand is currently in the midst of a second wave of methamphetamine - high quality manufactured meth from China - and it is cheap. The market for this meth is now supply driven rather than demand driven, pushing the price down."

The report said drug profits also increase a gangs' reach in the community.

"With this growth comes the very real risk of serious gang violence as rival gangs do whatever they consider necessary to maintain their existing 'markets', while also increasing their spheres of influence.

"This threat of inter-gang violence is also heightened by the fact that a significant number of influential gang leaders, recently deported from Australia, are entering the game here."