Kiwi delivery firm LazyAz is taking on UberEats and Amazon with its local service.

The business, founded by teenage entreprenuer Aryaman Taore, has been running for just under a year and now has an updated online marketplace and app.

LazyAz is on track to reach a yearly turnover of $1 million and business is booming, Taore says.

"Revenue is increasing, users are increasing, and in terms of delivery numbers we hit between 5000 to 6000 every month, and that's growing 10, 20 per cent at least, every month or so," Taore says.

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He says that the service's user count will hit 10,000 by the end of next month.

LazyAz is partnered with more than 150 brands such as Sal's Pizza, Habitual Fix and Pita Pit and offers users the option to purchase and have goods delivered from any store.

"We now have local stores on the app and when you click on those local stores you have catalogues and menus for those, which you can just simply click, order and add it to the cart, like you do for Amazon, and have it delivered 30 minutes later."

The arrival of much-anticipated UberEats has not affected his business, it has in fact had the opposite affect, Taore says.

"More awareness has come out of it," he says. "A lot of users have awareness of such services coming into the market, but then come back to us because they're not able to get to that local dairy to pick up milk or the Indian shop that's right next to them, which some other on-demand platforms might not have."

While food deliveries were initially the main customer demand, users are increasingly using the service for grocery shopping. The firm is also now putting a focus on offering other services, such as picking up and delivering dry cleaning.

"What we realised, especially with these competitors coming into the market - Amazon and what-not - local businesses just don't have an online platform, and don't have the convenience of delivery that online shopping has. We saw that gap in the market, and that's why we launched," Taore says.

Taore, now 19, started LazyAz in August last year with $1750 capital, funded partly from his own savings and partly from his parents.

Last year the start-up successfully crowdfunded $240,000 in equity capital to develop its current app and website, designed by Auckland-based 7 Glyphs.

What we realised, especially with these competitors coming into the market - Amazon and what-not - local businesses just don't have an online platform, and don't have the convenience of delivery that online shopping has.

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The business is preparing for a two-stage fundraising campaign later this year, to raise between $500,000 and $1 million to fund further expansion.

LazyAz has more than 50 drivers in its database.

Similar to the model of Uber, with drivers opting for jobs, LazyAz deliverers can accept jobs close to them.

"The deliverers have an app and its location-based, so if they're close to the location where the order needs to happen it will be passed on to them. If they don't accept it will be passed on, and it moves on until someone accepts it."

Forty per cent of LazyAz revenue comes from app users' delivery charges, sales commission and 60 per from its partners.

"LazyAz's model supports local businesses by providing them with an online platform and delivery service which helps increase sales and allows them to compete with global companies," Taore says.

The firm operates in most central Auckland suburbs and will expand to the North Shore, Wellington, Christchurch, Hamilton and Dunedin in coming months.