The Latest: ND gov. criticizes delay in oil pipeline

CANNON BALL, N.D. (AP) " The Latest on protests against the Dakota Access oil pipeline. (all times local):

4:50 p.m.

North Dakota's governor is criticizing a potential delay in completion of the Dakota Access oil pipeline.

Gov. Jack Dalrymple said Tuesday that an additional delay "does nothing but prolong and intensify the public safety issues imposed on Morton County and the state of North Dakota since the beginning of August," when protests against the pipeline broke out.

On Monday, the Army Corps of Engineers called for more study and input from the Standing Rock Sioux before it decides whether to allow the pipeline to cross under Lake Oahe. The tribe says the pipeline threatens drinking water and cultural sites.

In his statement, Dalrymple says a decision on the project easement "is long overdue." He says the pipeline would be safe.

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3:40 p.m.

Environmental attorney and Waterkeeper Alliance President Robert F. Kennedy Jr. is joining the protest against the Dakota Access oil pipeline, saying it's important to "the future of humanity."

The alliance seeks to protect watersheds worldwide. The Standing Rock Sioux believes the 1,200-mile pipeline that's to carry North Dakota oil through South Dakota and Iowa to Illinois could harm drinking water.

Kennedy on Tuesday visited the main protest camp, which is near the Missouri River in southern North Dakota. The pipeline route goes under the river, which is the source of the tribe's drinking water.

Kennedy's visit came on a day when pipeline demonstrations were held across the country.

Kennedy says the $3.8 billion pipeline will benefit billionaires, not the American people.

Pipeline developer Energy Transfer Partners says the pipeline is safe.

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2:10 p.m.

More than two dozen protesters against the Dakota Access oil pipeline were arrested west of Mandan, North Dakota, during a day in which activists held demonstrations nationwide.

Morton County sheriff's spokesman Rob Keller says about 400 protesters put a pickup truck and tree branches on BNSF Railway tracks Tuesday near a pipeline work staging area. The railroad says trains were delayed three hours.

Officers in riot gear used pepper spray and in one instance a stun gun against protesters who refused to leave.

Activists called for demonstrations at Army Corps of Engineers offices and at banks financing the pipeline construction. Protests were reported across the country, from California to Vermont.

The $3.8 billion pipeline is to carry North Dakota oil to a shipping point in Illinois. Opponents worry it will harm the environment.

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This item has been corrected to correct number of protesters arrested to more than two dozen instead of 28 based on updated figures from sheriff's department.

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11:45 a.m.

Hundreds of protesters against the Dakota Access oil pipeline gathered outside a work staging area west of Mandan, North Dakota, and disrupted freight train traffic.

Morton County sheriff's spokesman Rob Keller says protesters on Tuesday morning put a pickup truck and tree branches on BNSF Railway tracks. It wasn't immediately clear how many trains were affected.

Officers in riot gear responded. There were no immediate reports of arrests.

Mandan is about 50 miles north of a camp where hundreds of protesters have gathered in recent months to oppose the $3.8 billion pipeline that's to carry North Dakota oil to a shipping point in Illinois.

Robert F. Kennedy Jr. was slated to visit the camp later Tuesday. He's an environmental attorney and president of Waterkeeper Alliance, which seeks to protect watersheds worldwide.

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10:55 a.m.

The company building the $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline is seeking a federal court's permission to lay pipe under a Missouri River reservoir in North Dakota and finish the four-state project.

The Army Corps of Engineers called Monday for more study and input from the Standing Rock Sioux before it decides whether to allow the pipeline to cross under Lake Oahe. The tribe says the pipeline threatens drinking water and cultural sites.

Dallas-based Energy Transfer Partners and a subsidiary are asking U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C., to confirm the company has the legal right to proceed.

The Corps in July granted ETP the permits needed for the crossing, but it said in September that further analysis was warranted given tribal concerns.

ETP says additional delay amounts to politic interference.

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8:40 a.m.

The company building the $3.8 billion Dakota Access oil pipeline is denouncing a decision by the Army Corps of Engineers to delay an easement to cross a Missouri River reservoir in North Dakota.

Energy Transfer Partners CEO Kelcy Warren said in a statement Monday that the decision is "motivated purely by politics at the expense of a company that has done nothing but play by the rules."

The Corps wants more studies and tribal input before it decides whether to allow the pipeline to cross under Lake Oahe. The Standing Rock Sioux says the pipeline threatens drinking water and cultural sites. Protests have been ongoing for months.

ETP says it will "vigorously pursue its legal rights."

The 1,200-mile pipeline from North Dakota to Illinois is largely complete outside of the river crossing.

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8 a.m.

The Standing Rock Sioux chairman says the decision by the Army Corps of Engineers to delay an easement for the $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline indicates protests against the project are succeeding.

The Corps said Monday it needs more studies and tribal input before it can decide whether to allow the oil pipeline to cross under a Missouri River reservoir in North Dakota. The tribe says the pipeline would threaten drinking water and cultural sites. Protests against its construction have been ongoing for months.

Chairman Dave Archambault said in a statement that the Corps' decision is encouraging and shows the demonstrations are bringing the tribe's concerns to light.

An industry group supporting the pipeline criticized the Corps' decision. The MAIN Coalition called it an attempt at "death by delay."

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6:15 a.m.

Robert F. Kennedy Jr. is slated to join protesters of the Dakota Access pipeline in North Dakota.

Also Tuesday, activists have called for demonstrators to protest at Army Corps of Engineers offices and offices of banks that are financing the pipeline project. The protesters want President Barack Obama to permanently halt the construction of the $3.8 billion pipeline.

Kennedy is an environmental attorney and president of the New York-based Waterkeeper Alliance, which seeks to protect watersheds worldwide.

The pipeline is to run beneath a Missouri River reservoir in North Dakota that provides drinking water to the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, which says the pipeline threatens drinking water and cultural sites.

The pipeline would deliver oil from North Dakota through South Dakota and Iowa to a shipping point in Illinois.

This story has been automatically published from the Associated Press wire which uses US spellings

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