Kirsty Wynn is a senior reporter at the Herald on Sunday.

Homestead with six-generation history for sale

The sprawling five-bedroom Havelock North homestead known as Hilton Station is for sale after 145 years in the same family. Photo / Supplied
The sprawling five-bedroom Havelock North homestead known as Hilton Station is for sale after 145 years in the same family. Photo / Supplied

A pioneer homestead passed down through six generations is up for sale - ending 145 years in the same family.

Hilton Station Homestead just out of Havelock North in Hawke's Bay was built by colonial settler Robert Henry Mackenzie in 1871 and has been passed down from father to son ever since.

Mackenzie came to New Zealand with his family in 1854 as an eight-year-old.
Over the years, the property has hosted three Mackenzie family weddings, numerous wakes and multiple home-births during the late 1800s and early 1900s.

Past generations of the MacKenzie family sit on the lawn of the old homestead. Photo / Supplied
Past generations of the MacKenzie family sit on the lawn of the old homestead. Photo / Supplied

The farm was named Hilton Station after land owned by Robert Mackenzie's ancestors dating back to the 1300s in Scotland.

It was originally broken in by Robert Mackenzie as a 728ha sheep and beef stud farm.

Current owners Heather and Paul Mackenzie - the great-great-grandson of Robert Mackenzie - said the decision to sell had been hard but the time was right.

They still run it as a sheep and beef farm but want to try something different.

"It was a hard decision for Paul but neither of the boys are interested in farming and we would like to do something else," Heather MacKenzie said.

The interior of the original home on Hilton Station. Photo / Supplied
The interior of the original home on Hilton Station. Photo / Supplied

The couple were selling the property and 3.5 hectares of land by tender through Bayleys Havelock North. Also up for tender is the adjoining 502.5 hectare main Hill Station farm with its own secondary residence.

The two properties can be bought individually, or together.
Heather MacKenzie said the large parcel of land had resource consent for a 22-home development.

The sprawling five-bedroom character homestead is in original condition and even boasts the original "coffin-shaped" cast-iron bath.

The interior of the original homestead of Hilton Station is largely unchanged since it was built nearly 150 years ago. Photo / Supplied
The interior of the original homestead of Hilton Station is largely unchanged since it was built nearly 150 years ago. Photo / Supplied

Bayleys agent Tim Wynne-Lewis said the house had been well maintained.

"Inside, the home's colonial decor has remained relatively unchanged - from the high vaulted/wood ceiling hallway, the native timber grand sash windows, and three open fireplaces, through to the large 'farmhouse' kitchen and the billiard room reflective of bygone eras," he said.

"Outside, the wrap-around deck under the veranda is all original ... but I'm guessing the in-ground swimming pool outside was added some time in the past generation."

The property also features a grass tennis court which doubles up as a social-grade cricket pitch - capable of holding function marquees.

The MacKenzie family are prominent polo players, with current owner Paul MacKenzie seen here (second right of Charles) in Cirencester, England, in 1984. Photo / Supplied
The MacKenzie family are prominent polo players, with current owner Paul MacKenzie seen here (second right of Charles) in Cirencester, England, in 1984. Photo / Supplied

The Mackenzie family are prominent in the New Zealand international representative polo scene - with four generations playing for New Zealand.

- NZ Herald

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