Why everyone wants to move to New Zealand

Early morning sunlight catches Mt Hutt in the Southern Alps. Photo / File
Early morning sunlight catches Mt Hutt in the Southern Alps. Photo / File

Everyone seems to want to move to New Zealand, or is at least looking into the possibility.

Earlier this week US Supreme Court Justice Ruth Ginsburg told the New York Times if Donald Trump became President she would move to New Zealand.

Ginsburg's not the first from the US, notably Billy Crystal has also mentioned his interest in the move if Trump is victorious.

And it doesn't end there, fears of a future President Trump led to a spike in interest with Americans googling "move to New Zealand" this month.

Colorado and Washington were the two states most actively looking into the move.

In the United Kingdom, it's Brexit and not Trump that's leading people to New Zealand.

On June 24 the UK's own "move to New Zealand" search peaked 24 hours after the EU referendum, and merely hours after the discovery Brexit wiped $2 trillion off global markets.

In the UK, New Zealand was first choice for residents of Southampton, shown by Google News Lab's Simon Rogers for Citylab.com.

Helping New Zealand's image was an article by the Huffington Post that mentioned our "out of control" gorgeous beaches and mountains, how Wellington is (relatively) cheap for expats, our friendly locals, our hobbits, our great national parks, our "many, many sheep", our exceptional coffee, rugby in general and all our ancient natural wonders.

Along with this travel bloggers Luca and Lisa Barber have pushed New Zealand forward with their blog "Barbers Go Global", documenting their time in New Zealand since leaving their jobs in the US.

The pair have spoken through their blog about Luca's love for Narnia, asked New Zealand not to change in a warm open letter, and talked about the overwhelming kindness of kiwis.

Alongside the political dramas in the Southern Hemisphere the number of Australians coming to New Zealand has also risen.

Uncertainties with the future of Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull might be behind why Australia is losing 25,700 Australians to New Zealand while only 23,951 New Zealanders are jumping back over the ditch - a net gain of 1700 Australians.

- NZ Herald

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