More than 230,000km covered, across more than 70 nations and territories for 388 days.

That is how far the Queen's Baton will travel to get to the opening ceremony of the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games.

In the lead up the end of the baton's worldwide journey, a Tauranga woman is looking forward to "one of the best experiences" of her life as she prepares to carry the baton in the coming days.

Linley Scholes, who spent the majority of her life living in Tauranga but now lives on the Gold Coast, will carry the baton on April 1 as part of the Queen's Baton Relay.

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Scholes has dedicated much of her life to volleyball and beach volleyball through years of playing, coaching, managing and refereeing the sport, which is why she has been given the role.

"It's an absolutely incredible opportunity and I'm so honoured," she told the Bay of Plenty Times yesterday at her parents' home in Ohauiti.

Linley Scholes is honoured to carry the Queen's Baton as part of the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games. Pictured with a replica of the baton. Photo/ George Novak
Linley Scholes is honoured to carry the Queen's Baton as part of the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games. Pictured with a replica of the baton. Photo/ George Novak

Scholes, who works at the City of Gold Coast Council, was nominated by a colleague for her service to sport and would join thousands of Australians in being baton bearers.

"I'm so proud to be a Kiwi," she said with her strong New Zealand accent.

The baton left Buckingham Palace in March 2017 and has been carried through six continents by people of all ages and race.

Last December, the baton made its way on to New Zealand soil, where it visited Auckland, Christchurch and Queenstown, before reaching Australia on December 24.

The 63-year-old will carry the baton for 600 metres and will have four police officers running next to her.

"I can't believe I've been chosen," Scholes said.

She was no stranger to the sporting spotlight as she was the volleyball flagbearer at the World Masters Games in 2017.

She had competed in four World Masters Games for beach volleyball, had attended the Sydney Olympics in 2000, but this would be her first time at a Commonwealth Games.

Scholes was excited that beach volleyball would be played for the first time at the Commonwealth Games and she would be there to witness it.

"This is history, it's amazing."

The Queen's Baton
The baton was made of recycled plastic, macadamia wood and stainless steel. The Queen's message was printed on spinifex paper [a grass-like plant that has extensive traditional indigenous uses] and could be seen through a clear window.