Rob Kidd

Rob Kidd is a NZME. News Service court reporter based in Auckland.

Jail for running meth ring from mum's house

William MacFarlane at his sentencing on drug charges, at the Auckland High Court. Photo / Brett Phibbs
William MacFarlane at his sentencing on drug charges, at the Auckland High Court. Photo / Brett Phibbs

A man who ran a methamphetamine ring from his mum's house while serving a sentence of home detention has been jailed for seven and a half years.

William Luke MacFarlane, 30, appeared in the High Court at Auckland this morning on a slew of drugs charges from three separate sets of offending dating back to early 2012.

On February 16, 2012 he was sentenced to nine months' home detention, to be served at his mother's Rotorua home, for possession of the Class A drug P.

But Justice Susan Thomas told the court today it was only 12 days before MacFarlane was contacting associates and arranging drug deals.

Restricted by an electronic-monitoring anklet that would alert authorities if he left the house, MacFarlane organised his friend to meet meth manufacturer Andrei Kupkovic in Auckland.

Kupkovic would cook the P and Smith would bring the product back where he and MacFarlane arranged distribution.

Kupkovic, a formerly successful cafe owner, and two others who helped him produce the methamphetamine were sentenced to 34 years prison between them earlier this month.

Justice Thomas said the fact the dealing occurred while MacFarlane was serving another sentence was a "seriously aggravating" factor.

His lawyer Mark Edgar said his client's offending represented an escalation from his criminal history, most of which was centred around cannabis-related crime.

Though MacFarlane's mother supported him and cared for his 9-year-old son, the rest of his family had not been as helpful.

Mr Edgar said his father William MacFarlane Snr had given his son methamphetamine when he was 18 and had recently been jailed for 14 years for offending "very similar" to his son's.

The offender's aunt will soon be sentenced for drug offending and his uncle was recently recalled to prison.

Both his sister and her husband were also serving substantial sentences for their crimes, which Mr Edgar said pointed to a "familial cycle" that his client could not avoid.

"[MacFarlane] felt almost compelled or resigned to step up and assume [his father's] mantle," he said.

The offender had also become associated with the Manga Kaha Auckland chapter of the Black Power gang, which saw him become involved with "standovers" or "taxings".

He fed information to members about who was producing large quantities of methamphetamine so they could be robbed of their product or cash.

Justice Thomas said there was no need to impose a minimum term of imprisonment on MacFarlane.

She said the Parole Board would be best placed to assess his suitability for release.

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