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Ask Phoebe: Get Vector to see if tree poses risk

By Phoebe Falconer

3 comments
If tree limbs are posing a problem to power lines, phone Vector. Photo / Thinkstock
If tree limbs are posing a problem to power lines, phone Vector. Photo / Thinkstock

Our house is in a Grey Lynn street lined with large and beautiful plane trees. These are trimmed by council contractors.

The tree on the grass verge near our front fence has enormous limbs which extend across our small front garden, just above the power lines to the house and over our roof. As well as the leaves, twigs and other debris which fall continuously and clog the gutters, quite large sections of branch fall on to the garden, roof and lines.

Who is responsible for ensuring the tree does not pose a safety risk and how can we initiate some pruning? Alison Anderson and Marnie Hunter, Grey Lynn.

If the tree limbs are posing a problem to power lines, you should phone Vector (09 978 7788) or your local power-line company and ask that they inspect the trees for incipient risk.

It would also pay to phone the Auckland Council (09 301 0101) as trees on a verge or berm are their responsibility. Consent is needed from the council for major tree work in its region.

We were surprised and disappointed to read that the Hazmobile has been discontinued. Do you have any suggestions as to where we might now take old batteries, smoke alarms and other hazardous material? Warren and Carla Drake, Orakei.

To my knowledge, the Hazmobile service has not ceased - yet. According to Auckland Council's draft Waste Management and Minimisation Plan, the hazardous waste collection service could be replaced by a scheme in which residents would drop off dangerous waste at depots. Implementation would begin in 2015.

At the moment the Hazmobile service is supplemented by collection sites at the Silverdale Transfer Station and the Waitakere Refuse and Recycling Transfer.

I was walking to work, on the footpath, when a car coming from behind turned into the driveway I was about to walk across. I had to jump clear as it was not going to stop. I could not see or hear it approach as there was lots of traffic. Who has right of way on a footpath, a pedestrian or a car turning into a driveway? Amanda Puddle, Auckland.

The pedestrian has right of way. There is what's called a duty of care, where motorists must take precautions to not jeopardise any other road user. Having said that, it behoves pedestrians also to take care and look in all directions before crossing a driveway.

- NZ Herald

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